The power of the human body

Time and time again I tell myself “I don’t think I can do that”, and my body proves me wrong.

Those who know me know that yoga is a huge part of my life. It is more than just a hobby, it is a way of life. I highly recommend yoga for anyone with (or without!) chronic illness, because yoga really is accessible to everyone. I will admit that my absolute favourite parts of yoga are the headstands, the handstands and all other things that really challenge me physically. But here’s the thing: yoga isn’t really about the headstands, handstands or any other fancy poses. Yoga means ‘to yoke’; to unite; to join; to connect. It is a process of becoming more aware of who we really are. The poses we typically associate with ‘yoga’ in the West are one way of working towards this, but anything that helps us connect with ourselves is yoga. Therefore, anyone can practice yoga. It doesn’t require physical fitness, it assumes no religious underpinning, and it doesn’t mean you have to pay £8 to attend a class. Sit for 5 minutes focusing on the sensations in your body – yoga. Use techniques to regulate your breath when you feel stressed – yoga. Practice self-compassion, being honest with yourself about what is right for you – yoga. In fact, everything we do could be yoga if we practiced it with full awareness.

For the last couple of years I have dabbled in acroyoga, which combines yoga with acrobatics, working with and supporting other people in pairs or groups. There are a million reasons why I love acroyoga: it appeals to my love of a physical challenge, it pushes me outside my comfort zone, it builds trust and communication, and above all, it is seriously good fun! Around 6 months ago I had a bad patch health-wise, my mental health and motivation suffered, and I stopped practicing acroyoga. Before I knew it, I was out of practice and convinced I wouldn’t be able to do it anymore, and acroyoga was no longer a part of my life.

Just before Christmas, I was having a good week and I bit the bullet and went to my local acroyoga class. I was nervous about going. I really didn’t know what I would be able to manage physically, I had been out of action for so long and I was convinced that I would no longer be able to do the things I used to be able to do, that everyone else would be better than me and that I would have a miserable time (self-pity anyone?!).

Well, how wrong I was! I managed all the poses I could do before, including the one in the picture, which I had actually really struggled to get the hang of when I was practicing regularly, and which I’d only ever successfully done twice before (thanks to my fellow acroyogi for letting me use this picture!). But more than that, I had fun. I instantly reconnected with the wonderful community of acroyogis and I forgot about all my problems. It was the happiest I had felt for a long time.

I honestly cannot believe what my body allowed me to achieve that night, but when I think about it, I really don’t need to be upside down hanging off someone’s legs to realise how powerful my body is. I have been chronically sick for years and yet every day my heart continues to beat, my lungs continue to breath, and my body allows me to live a relatively normal life. Day after day I feel my body struggling just to make it to the end of the day, and yet, after 6 months of inactivity I was still able to do challenging poses and even learn some new poses. I have absolutely no idea how my body does it, but it does. Time and time again I tell myself “I don’t think I can do that”, and my body proves me wrong.

I know that I am fortunate. I know that for many with chronic illness, a good day means making it to the shower. I am lucky that my body allows me to achieve things that for many would feel impossible. But the message is still the same. Chronic illness can feel like a daily battle: me vs body. It can feel like my body is punishing me, fighting me, willing me to give in and just be sick. And then I have moments like that evening at acroyoga, and I am reminded that my body is not fighting me at all. My body is willing me to be well, not sick. Even in my sickest times, my body continues to chug along in the background, waiting patiently for me to be well again. My body is not my enemy, it is my friend.

The art of self-acceptance

When you are living in hope of a different life, you are wasting the one you already have.

The last couple of months have been quite bad for me health-wise. I’ve cut right back on my hobbies and social activities because getting through a day at work is, most of the time, all I can manage. This has meant a huge cut in the amount of time I’ve spent with my friends.

For some reason, socialising is particularly exhausting when I’m unwell. All activities are exhausting to some extent, and pacing is a concept I am finally trying to increasingly bring into my life. I have always been very resistant to the idea of pacing – I don’t WANT to rest, I shouldn’t HAVE to rest, it’s not fair blah blah blah woe is me. But recently I have begun to accept that this is my life. Whether or not it’ll be my life forever, I really don’t know. I sure hope not, but right now this is what I’m dealing with and being able to pace, knowing when to stop and learning where my boundary lies on a particular day, is something I believe will be really important if I want to maintain a reasonable quality of life.

But for reasons I’m not quite sure of, social contact is one of the activities I have to be extra careful with. As a fairly introverted person I think part of it is just that it’s in my nature to find social situations quite tiring. But there definitely seems to be some relationship to chronic illness, and I’ve interestingly read some other blogs that have said similar things. Social interaction is just exhausting when you’re battling poor health.

An extra challenge arises when your health is unpredictable, because social events require plans, and sticking to plans can prove to be very tricky if you don’t know how you’re going to be feeling on any given day. There is nothing much that makes me feel worse than having to cancel on a friend because I’m too sick. Not only do I have the usual disappointment for myself not being able to do something I was looking forward to, but there’s the added guilt of having let your friend down last-minute.

So, much to my sadness, meeting up with friends has taken a bit of a back seat recently. Today I drove past a restaurant where me and one of my close friends like to go, and it made me think of her. She had a very important interview recently and I wasn’t able to offer her help in preparing for it as I had hoped, as I wasn’t very well. I was suddenly hit with a huge wave of guilt that I have really not been much of a friend to her recently. So I sent her a message to say I’m sorry I’ve not been much fun lately. And this was her reply:

“You don’t have to be fun….ever”

Those few small words meant so much to me that I can’t even begin to express it in words. Because, those words imply one thing – acceptance. My friend is accepting me exactly as I am right now. Not as the version of me I wish I could be more often. Not as the healthy me. Not as the fun me, the drunk me, the let’s-go-on-an-adventure me, the I-can-help-you-with-your-interview me. Just me.

I am very fortunate to have a handful of people who show me complete acceptance. My family are wonderful, never expecting anything from me, but giving me infinite love and support. Likewise, my boyfriend has shown me that it’s ok to rest, to take care of myself, even if that means sacrificing fun plans we have made together. And I have several friends who, despite all the times I’ve had to cancel my arrangements with them, have never responded with anything other than “get well soon”.

Self-acceptance is hard for us all at times, but it is especially hard when you crave a life that you cannot live. I long for good health, for my illness to be taken away and to be able to live a life without it. But I think it’s fair to say that for the forseeable future that probably isn’t going to happen. Life is now more about managing it than curing it, and with that comes a longing for all the things I feel I am losing or have already lost. It is a fine balance between acceptance and giving up. I don’t want to give up on the notion that I may achieve good health again one day. But I also don’t want to spend much more of my life wishing for things to be different, because when you are living in hope of a different life, you are wasting the one you already have.

Accepting a situation that you are unhappy with is not easy. Accepting a version of yourself that you wouldn’t choose to be, is not easy. But having total acceptance from the people you care about is one giant step towards self-acceptance.

Lonely companionship

Loneliness is a funny old thing. I’m 28 years old and I have a more active social life than I’ve ever had. I have so many wonderful people I can call friends, friends of all ages from all walks of life who each offer me something different but equally rewarding, and who I can hopefully offer something to in return. I have a big and very supportive family who all live nearby. And I have a boyfriend.

And yet, chronic illness leaves an inevitable trail of loneliness. The unpredictability of good days and bad days means that you can go from a social life in full swing to intense isolation at the drop of a hat. Days and evenings where your fun plans are cancelled in exchange for pyjamas and the television.

Even when I’m not physically isolated, when I manage to make it into work, to yoga class, or even to meet up with friends, I often do these things feeling a long way off 100%. There is a constant trade off between not pushing myself too hard but doing as much as I can for the sake of my mental health. And therefore, sometimes I do things when I know in my heart that my body wants me to rest. I think this is probably something I need to get better at; listening more to my body. But these are hard decisions to make on a daily basis, knowing that going out might make you sicker, but staying home might push you over the boundary into an emotional low.

And so, sometimes, I will be out and about, doing my daily routine while feeling unwell. And it is in these moments, when I am physically still connected to people, that I feel the most isolated. Because in those moments I look around and see my friends, family, colleagues, living the life I long to live. I am filled with envy for everyone who is able to get on with their day to day life without the constant worries of chronic illness. It is a stark reminder of how hard it is for anyone else to understand my situation, to understand how it feels both physically and mentally to be living my world. I guess, ultimately, we are all alone in our bodies; no one else will ever know what it is like to be us. But on those days when I am functioning on the outside as a ‘normal’ human being, while feeling sick and tired as though the life has been sucked out of me on the inside, I feel a sense of deep loneliness and isolation, no matter how physically connected I am to others.

With my usual positive hat on I am trying to find a nice, cheerful way to wrap up this post. But I promised myself this blog would be my place to write my true feelings; not a show for anyone else, but a diary for me. So, here it is. I’m 28 years old. I have friends, family and a boyfriend. And sometimes, I feel lonely.