How chronic illness affects everything… yes, everything

Recently, I have been feeling a little disconnected from the world. There is so much about chronic illness that anyone without chronic health issues would struggle to understand, that I find it difficult to really, truly connect with people. I know that I can’t expect anyone without chronic health issues to understand. I also know that even by talking (and writing) about how chronic illness affects everything, I may be creating further barriers between you versus me; us versus them; healthy versus sick. But I am ok with that, because this message needs to be heard.

Chronic illness affects EVERYTHING. I mean, absolutely everything. Before I had health issues, I could never have comprehended the scale of it. I could have understood that it must be crap to feel ill all the time, that it must take a toll on your mental health and your ability to do the things that you enjoy. I think that most people can understand that. But the day-to-day impact of chronic illness is unimaginable. This message is so important. It is important for others with chronic illness to hear this – it is hard, and I hear you my friends. But it is also important for those without chronic illness to hear this – the magnitude of chronic illness is immense and so, if your friends who are sick seem to be struggling under the weight of it all, this might just be why.

Ok here are the things I can think of, off the top of my head, that are affected by chronic illness (for me). Some are pretty obvious. Others are darn right peculiar.

  • The beauty products I buy – must be organic with no parabens, SLS, phthalates, silicones etc. The skin is the largest organ in the body (at least that’s what we were taught at school – is that really true?). Well anyway, we have a lot of skin, and what you put on your skin is absorbed into your blood stream. I actually think that everyone should avoid standard off-the-shelf makeup and toiletries but, if you have pre-existing medical issues this is perhaps even more important. This means a limited number of shops I can get these products at and of course, they are a lot more expensive. The most painful product for me is suncream. Holy moly, non-toxic suncream is expensive!!
  • The jobs that I can apply for. This one I am really feeling of late. I am coming to the end of my PhD, and, like most PhD students, I am freaking out a little bit about what I’m going to do next. But, unlike most PhD students, I need a job that has flexible hours, the ability to work from home, a boss that supports those things, and where I can spend a decent chunk of my work time doing things like writing or reading, that don’t require communication or travel or other things that are very energy-zapping for me.
  • The dental work that I have done. Yes, seriously. I had a tooth extracted and a bridge in its place last year, when my dentist just wanted me to redo a root canal. Alas, root canals can apparently (mostly anecdotally) cause issues for people with chronic health issues and to be honest, whether that’s true or total beloney it doesn’t really matter; if there’s a risk of it making my health issues worse, I can’t do it. So, yeah, tooth extracted.
  • What I do in my spare time. Well yes that’s an obvious one. Mostly my spare time is spent doing restful activities like reading and watching tv, combined with gentle exercise when I can manage (I.e. walking), self-educating about all things health related (you would not believe the random shit I know), and cooking. Because everything has to be home cooked from scratch.
  • Where we go for dinner. On the subject of food, there are now, I think 3 restaurants where we can comfortably eat without it being an incredibly stressful experience. Places that have a flexible menu and staff that are patient and understanding enough to deal with “I’d like this meal but without the chips, without the sauce, without the bread, and with a salad on the side please!” Every now and then, if it’s a special occasion, I will eat at a restaurant that I don’t deem “safe”, but I will pay some heavy consequences afterwards.
  • Where we buy our food shopping. We have two stipulations: 1) we have to be able to order home delivery, because the odds of me being well enough to manage a supermarket trip are not that great (so that rules out the cheap supermarkets); 2) they have to have a good selection of organic meat and vegetables, because that is essentially all we eat.
  • What food we buy. No ready meals, pizzas or chips here. There is virtually nothing we can eat that is easy. Everything is cooked from scratch. Even things like gluten free bread are so full of crap that I don’t really want to touch it, plus they normally have either rice flour or potato starch and I can’t tolerate rice or potatoes so… yeah.
  • What time I go to bed. Because I need 9 hours of sleep and even a couple of nights without it starts to affect me. 9pm is my bedtime, by the way.
  • What time I get up. Because meditating in the morning is really not optional if I want to try and keep my nervous system calm, which, of course is important for healing. And because rushing to get ready is about the worst thing for anyone’s nervous system. My morning routine is 2 hours long.
  • How often I see my friends. Not very often, in case you were wondering. When I am well enough, and when I have had a good enough patch of health that I am at least partly on top of housework and other life commitments. Or I’m so unwell that I’ve given up all hope of housework or other commitments, and I have a friend that is kind enough to come see me even though I’ll be in bed the whole time (I currently have one friend who will do this – I hope she is reading, she is a gem).
  • Who my friends are – people who I like and who like me but who are also patient and understanding, and know that plans are likely to be cancelled last minute at least 50% of the time. Many of my closest friends now are people that I have met and communicate with online, rather than in-person. I really value the internet and the social opportunities it provides for so many people who would otherwise be very isolated.
  • Our sex life. Sorry to the prudes reading this but, yeah, chronic illness affects this shit.
  • How we use our holiday leave. Most of our annual leave is used on doctors appointments. I am lucky I have a flexible job so that my routine appointments don’t need to involve official leave. But the bigger appointments require annual leave, and our holiday savings have been used on medical trips in the past.
  • Where we can travel. Somewhere where there are restaurants that cater for complex dietary needs; somewhere where everything is within a short walking distance; somewhere where we can take a small suitcase worth of medical stuff. Hence why next year we will be revisiting our favourite Greek spot that ticks all of these boxes!
  • The books I buy. This isn’t a bad thing by any means – I looooove books! But mostly they are health related books (which also isn’t a bad thing in my eyes – I love to learn about the body!).
  • The house we purchased – we were previously renting a mouldy house, which can have hugely detrimental health effects, particularly for people with pre-existing health issues, and for approximately 25% of the population who have genetic mutations that prevent them being able to effectively detox mould spores. We were so worried about mould exposure that we bought a new build, almost exclusively for this reason.
  • The arguments we have as a couple. Our relationship is pretty solid and I think my love will agree that chronic illness has made us infinitely stronger, both individually and as a couple. But oh Christ it is so hard on a relationship. He has to pick up more chores when I’m sick; I feel guilty when I can’t do stuff; he feels sad and stressed when I’m ill; I feel sad and stressed when I’m ill; we have to try and support each other while both struggling to cope ourselves. To every couple out there affected by chronic illness, I salute you.
  • How we spend our sundays. About half of our Sunday is spent food prepping for the week. Lunches, snacks and sometimes breakfasts. Because nothing can be bought on the go.
  • Our financial situation. This is largely unspoken about in the chronic illness world, or maybe just in the world generally. But I have no shame in saying, that we spend a fortune on stuff relating to health. Mostly food, because of all the reasons above. But also – beauty products (that darn suncream), supplements, having a cleaner (which, I appreciate, might seem like a luxury, but is actually a necessity), buying random things like water filters and paying for dental extractions! And these are just the day to day costs. We get substantial support with my treatment costs, which is the only reason we can afford the treatments I am having.

The magnitude of chronic illness is unthinkable. To those of you reading this who also are affected by chronic illness, I hope you understand that you are not alone. Keep going you brave, brave warriors. To those of you reading who are not affected by chronic illness, thank you for reading! Thank you for taking an interest. And thank you to those of you who provide support to me or to anyone else with a chronic illness. We could not do it without you.

Holding on to self-identity

I recently watched a TED talk by a lady called Jennifer Brea, who spoke about her experiences of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ME. You know that feeling when someone sums up your own experiences so completely that you feel a warm sense of belonging? When those thoughts and feelings that are so complex you can’t even completely make sense of them yourself, are perfectly expressed by someone else and you suddenly realise you are not as alone as you thought you were? That’s how this TED talk made me feel. If you are someone with chronic illness, if you know someone with chronic illness, or if you’re just a human being who’s interested in the experiences of others, please take some time to watch it:

TED Talk Jen Brea: What happens when you have a disease doctors can’t diagnose

She starts the talk by showing what her life used to be like. 28 years old, studying for a PhD, in a loving relationship and enjoying life. I recently attended a conference at which there was a presentation by someone from a CFS treatment centre, who said that many people with CFS share common personality traits: high-achieving, active, introvert and perfectionist. Apparently there is research to support this, although I’ve not read the studies myself. But it’s interesting, because I think my friends and family would probably say I fit that overall description, and from Jennifer’s talk, it sounds like she would too.

I have no idea why this would be. I might speculate that being an introvert and a perfectionist is mentally stressful, and being an active go-getter can be physically stressful, an maybe this puts a strain on the immune system. Or maybe when people who push themselves a little too hard get sick, they don’t rest as much as they should, and the body finds it harder to recover. I don’t know, these are just ideas, and I can think of many other reasons why this might be true.

Nonetheless, it strikes me as ironic that the people who are most likely to develop CFS are those who are least likely to enjoy resting and taking life slowly. Of course, I’m not suggesting for a second that anyone would enjoy chronic fatigue syndrome or any chronic illness, but for those of us who really enjoy being on the go, both physically and mentally, chronic illness is a bit of a slap in the face. And this led me to think about how chronic illness affects our self-identity.

During my good years, I was a very active person. I LOVE exercise. I would even say I get a little addicted to exercise. I used to run two or three times a week, go to various classes at the gym, lift weights and do high intensity interval training. I haven’t done any of these things for about 3 years. Actually that’s a lie. About 6 months ago after a particularly good week I decided to attempt a body pump class. The weights I lifted were about a quarter of what I used to lift two or three times a week during my good years. And yet that one class led to a major crash that took me about a week to recover from. It might sound a bit sad, but I think about body pump all the time. I used to love body pump. It was more than just a gym class. It was a hobby, a social activity, a way to keep fit and feel good about myself. Body pump was a part of my self-identity.

During my good years, I was also a runner. Admittedly, not a very good one. I was never going to make it to the olympics but god damn it, I loved to run. Just before my health really took a turn for the worse, I ran with a wonderful running group in the town where I live. I met some fantastic people. People I still call friends several years since I last ran with them. But still, it’s hard to keep in touch with your ‘running friends’ when you can’t run anymore. Running was a huge part of my life. It was something I did for me, to keep active, to get outside even on the coldest and wettest of days, to stay in touch with nature, and to have a good old chat with my running buddies. Running was a part of my self-identity.

During my good years, I used to love walking. There isn’t much in life that makes me happier than being outside. The beach, the forest, the moors, wherever – if it’s outside, I want to be there. I crave the outdoors. I am lucky that my health doesn’t restrict me as much as it does for many people, and I do still get outdoors sometimes. But it’s hard enough even when you are in good health to find the time and energy to go for a walk, so when you have unpredictable health to add to the list of things that make it difficult, trips to the countryside are a rare treat for me now. Being outdoors makes me feel alive, it makes me feel happiness and joy right down to my bones. Ever since I was a young child I have been an outdoorsey-person. My favourite thing as a kid was to help my Dad out in the garden. Being an outdoorsey person was not just for fun; it was part of my self-identity.

During my good years, I used to love meeting my friends for a drink on a Friday night. Ok, this isn’t exactly the healthiest activity in the world. But sometimes, there’s nothing that hits the spot quite like a glass of wine or two with your friends. A chance to forget about all your worries from the week just gone and the week up ahead, and let your hair down with the people whose company you enjoy most. These days, I really can’t tolerate alcohol. In fact since starting my Lyme disease treatment, I’m not able to drink at all due to drug interactions. I’m not saying I want to be drinking a bottle of wine every night, but it would be nice to have the option once in a while to meet my friends for a few drinks and know that it won’t put me in bed for a week. The freedom to go out for a drink was a right; a choice that was taken away from me. That choice was part of my self-identity.

During my good years, I used to love doing puzzles. I don’t mean picture puzzles like your granny used to do (although those are fun too!). I mean logic puzzles, crosswords, sudoku, brain-teasers. I may have got my love of the outdoors from my Dad, but I definitely got my Mum’s love of numbers. One of the symptoms I find most frustrating now is brain fog. It doesn’t happen all the time, and I definitely don’t get it as badly as many people with Lyme disease do. In fact, I count my lucky stars that I am still able to engage in my work, and it’s mentally challenging work at that. But I do struggle. On my sicker days, I struggle to find words. I know what I want to say in my head, but I can’t get the words out. I struggle to engage in anything mentally challenging and any attempt at an academic conversation has me totally exhausted. I have gotten pretty good at approaching my work flexibly, so that on those bad days I do the more mundane jobs, and I reserve the thinking jobs, the reading, the writing, for the good days. And I’m so fortunate that I have good days. But how I would love to not be restricted mentally, academically, and professionally, by my health. Being a thinker, an academic, a logic puzzle loving nerd; they were part of my self-identity.

I think you get the picture. Chronic illness changes your self-identity. It takes away the things that made you, you. And suddenly, through no choice of your own, you are a different person. I don’t think you really lose your self-identity, but rather, you gain a new self-identity. These days, I spend a lot of time doing crochet in my pyjamas, and honestly, I get a lot of pleasure from that. But if I had the choice, I would much rather be at the gym or going for a jog. Yoga is also a huge part of my life now, and the wonderful thing is that I never take it for granted. Every single time I roll out my yoga mat I am grateful that my body, mind and life circumstances have allowed me to be there. Many are not so lucky.

But if chronic illness changes your self-identity, what happens if you get well? Recovery is something that I think about and dream about every single day and I can’t even begin to describe what I would give to have my health back. And yet, there is anxiety about recovery. Because if I recover, if I am no longer a sick person – who am I? Many of the things that now make up my self-identity will once again be taken away. I won’t have to sit in my pyjamas crocheting a cardigan, but I might choose to. Holy smokes, I will have the choice! That sounds both wonderful and scary at the same time. If I recover, will I return to the running, gym-loving, weight-lifting, puzzle-completing nutcase I once was, or am I now a permanent crocheting, pyjama-loving, in-bed-by-9pm, stone cold sober, sensible person? Have I held on to my self-identity, or have I lost it forever?

 

 

The worst diagnosis of all

A couple of years ago I bought a book called ‘Why can’t I get better’, by Richard Horowitz, and it was all about Lyme Disease. I remember reading it at the time and thinking wow, so much of this sounds familiar. I did some research and quickly discovered that Lyme disease, in its chronic form, is extremely controversial. The NHS in the UK (and the CDC in the US) do not accept that Lyme disease exists as a chronic condition, and the vast majority of doctors work to this effect. In addition, the test that is used in the NHS and in many healthcare services worldwide has notoriously bad sensitivity, meaning it produces a lot of false negatives. There are calls, by researchers and clinicians worldwide, for a new approach to Lyme disease [1 – this is an academic paper, but is only 1 page long and very readable, so I highly encourage everyone to read it!*(see footnote)].

At the time when I read this book, I quickly dismissed the possibility of Lyme disease based entirely on this controversy. Partly I think it was because I thought to myself (naively, I now recognise) that if the NHS doesn’t treat it, it can’t be a real thing. It must be a conspiracy theory and I don’t want to waste my money or time looking into that. And partly I think it was that I just didn’t want the hassle of thinking about something so complex, so put it to the back of my mind.

Fast forward to last month. I had a severe throat infection and after a visit to my GP was prescribed a 10 day course of antibiotics. A few days into the antibiotics, not only had my throat infection cleared, but I felt on top of the world! All of my EBV symptoms completely disappeared. For the first time in years the glands in my neck went down to a normal size. I had so much energy, no sore throat, no headache, no achey joints or muscles, no fever….it was incredible. There’s a funny thing that happens when you are chronically sick. Your level of ‘normal’ changes. You somehow get used to feeling shit all the time. Sometimes you feel a bit shit, sometimes you feel really shit. But always shit. You forget what it’s like to not feel shit and adjust to going about your daily routine feeling this way. Sometimes you even start to question whether you do in fact feel shit – is this just how people feel? Am I just a hypochondriac, or overly sensitive? Chronic illness really messes with your head. So this period of wellness when I was taking the antibiotics last month was like a light had been switched on. “Oh yes, THIS is how it feels to be well!”

Alas, my excitement was short-lived. A few days after the course of antibiotics ended, I came crashing back down to chronic illness earth. All of my EBV symptoms returned and I went back to feeling…. you guessed it, shit. And this was what drew my attention back to Lyme disease. Lyme is a bacterial infection, spread by ticks, and treated with antibiotics. I started doing some digging and once again found so much that made sense to me. Lyme disease suppresses your immune system and can lead to chronic reactivation of viruses like EBV. It can suppress your pituitary gland, the ‘master gland’ that is directly and indirecly responsible for the production of many hormones in the body, including sex hormones. Those who know me or follow my blog will know that my oestrogen and progesterone levels fall within the range for a post-menopausal woman, way below that expected for a 28 year old. Lyme is also said to flare in cycles and many women experience particularly bad symptoms at particular times of their menstrual cycle, which has always been the case for me.

So with all this in mind I decided to get tested. Like many people with chronic illness, I do not have a good relationship with my GP. In fact I don’t even see my NHS GP for anything chronic illness related anymore. Instead I found a private accredited lab that uses a different type of test that has much greater sensitivity and specificity. Yesterday I had the results of those tests back, and it was positive. I have Lyme disease. The one diagnosis I hoped I would never receive. Being caught up in a controversial illness that is so poorly accepted by the UK health service, is not what I ever wanted for myself. For those of us with Lyme (that was a weird thing to write – I am now ‘one of those’), we are pretty much on our own. My next step is to find a doctor, hopefully in the UK but potentially abroad, who recognises Lyme disease in its chronic form and will help support me. The good news in all of this, is that I finally have an underlying explanation for all the problems I have experiened. Chronic EBV never felt like the whole picture. In one of my early blog posts (Relationships, love and infertility) I talked about what sod’s law it was that EBV seems to reactivate when my oestrogen is low, AND that I have chronically low oestrogen. Well, Lyme is an explanation for both of these things.

Nonetheless, there are many emotions associated with this diagnosis. Fear of what lies ahead. Disappointment that I’ve spent so long being ill, fighting the wrong battles and climbing the wrong mountains. Anxiety over the new label attached to my name. Guilt for my loved ones that they too have a new label to consider. But above all, there is huge comfort in the knowledge and understanding I now have, and hope for my future.

 

Reference

[1] Borgermans, L., Perronne, C., Balicer, R., Polasek, O. (2015). Lyme disease: time for a new approach? The British Medical Journal, 351. Available here: http://www.bmj.com/content/351/bmj.h6520

*I have since discovered this paper is sadly not open access so is only available to those who work in academia or related fields – if you would like to read it please let me know and I can send you a copy

Other resources

Grief and chronic illness

Chronic illness is about so much more than the physical illness itself. It seeps into every aspect of your being, slowly making swaps and exchanges in every facet of life until one day, you wonder who you even are anymore.

Since starting this blog, I’ve been surprised at how much I’ve posted about emotions. I’m not a particularly emotional person on the face of it, and I find it hard to express how I’m feeling. But somehow it’s easier to write down how I’m feeling than it is to say it out loud. In fact, my very first blog post was about The emotions of chronic illness.

Today I’ve been thinking a lot about grief. Grief is a funny thing. It’s a strong word that we tend to reserve for the death of a loved one. But really, grief is much broader than that. A relationship break-up – grief for the person you once loved. Moving away – grief for the friendships you’re leaving behind. The beginning of winter – grief over the warm sunshine being lost. Ok, the last one might be stretching it a bit. But I do think that for those of us who get a bit blue at the end of the summer, there is a hint of grief in there.

In chronic illness, grief is a particularly strong emotion, and for me at least, it’s something I struggle with on a very regular basis. As the realisation sets in that your health problems are not going anywhere fast, you have to adjust to a new sense of self-identity, and with that, loss of the person you once were. This is something I find especially difficult because my health fluctuates greatly from day to day, week to week, month to month. This time last year, I was very unwell, doing very little except working and sleeping. This time six months ago, I was in India training to be a yoga teacher. And now, six months on again, I am somewhere in between, but certainly closer to the sick version of me than the healthy version.

I have been reflecting today on my time in India, and looking back on pictures, thinking how strong and healthy I looked. Don’t get me wrong, I was by no means in complete health, and the trip was a huge struggle for me, both physically and mentally. But I did it, I went there, I completed the course and I came home stronger in so many ways. There is absolutely no way I would be able to do that right now. The last month I have had more bad days than good days, and I know my body would not allow me to be working that hard at the moment. In fact, I haven’t been to any of my usual yoga classes for two weeks. That might not sound like a lot, but yoga is a huge part of who I am. It picks me up when I’m feeling knocked down, calms my mind, and reminds me of everything I love about life. So when I am too sick for yoga, I feel like a part of me is missing. And with that, comes grief.

But it’s not just about yoga. I look at my life now and I see only a fraction of the life I once had. So much of it is constrained by illness. I haven’t had a nice evening with a friend for way too long. I haven’t been for a run, or even a gentle jog, for a couple of years. I haven’t been able to scoff a bar of dairy milk for god knows how long and I know, I know, dairy milk is cheap and nasty and mostly sugar but I don’t care what you say, it’s delicious. I reflect on my life now and sometimes I wonder what I am actually achieving. The only thing I really have to be proud of at the moment is my PhD, which I have just started and am really excited about. But even that is filled with anxiety and limitation. Will I be able to keep up with the demands of my workload? Will the stress make me even sicker? Will I even be well enough to see it through?

I look back over my life and I used to feel so proud of who I was, of what I was achieving. I was such a go-getter. No, I still AM a go-getter, but it doesn’t feel like there is much I can actually go and get anymore. The extent of what I am doing, both in my day-to-day life and in the broader picture, is only a fraction of what it used to be. I feel as though my self-identity has totally shifted, and not through any choice of my own. The person I am now is not the person I want to be. Not the person I signed up to be. And I feel grief over the version of me I have lost.

Chronic illness is about so much more than the physical illness itself. It seeps into every aspect of your being, slowly making swaps and exchanges in every facet of life until one day, you wonder who you even are anymore. But, all is not lost. Chronic illness has given me things too, not just taken away. Although it may be hard to convince myself of it sometimes, I know deep down that I am not a lesser person now than I used to be, I am simply a different person. And ultimately, we are all changing every day, whether we like it or not. Perhaps chronic illness just better prepares us for the inevitable losses and gains of life.

When chronic illness rules the world

I’ve just got back from a wonderful few days in the welsh countryside with my lovely man. I hadn’t been feeling well for about a week before we went, but I felt well enough to go and we had planned to mainly do nothing, except a bit of walking if we could, so it seemed like a good idea.

Actually, it was a very good idea. A few days away from the hustle and bustle of life, just the two of us in the middle of nowhere. The chance to switch off from everything was amazing, and I’m so lucky to have opportunities like that. I follow many chronic illness blogs and I know that for many with chronic illness, trips away like that would be absolutely impossible, so I am grateful that I still have some freedom.

Nonetheless, there is, as always, a twinge of sadness that my illness still controls so much of my life. I still felt sick for most of the time we were away, and once in a while it would be nice to just be able to enjoy normal experiences like a trip away without feeling crap. We went for a nice walk, about 5 miles, on our first day there, which was so beautiful, but it definitely tired me out and I felt pretty bad in the evening. I’m such a go-getter, an active person, and I’ve adored the outdoors since I was a little girl. I remember as a small child jumping at the chance to help my Dad in the garden, and I think that love of the outdoors will be a firm part of who I am until the day I die. Nothing much makes me happier than the countryside. So in an ideal world, I would have spent the entire 3 days of our trip outdoors in one form or another.

I look back on who I once was. Many years ago, when my health was in a better place, I would have been up at the crack of dawn, going for a cross-country run, coming back for breakfast before heading out for a 10 mile walk, before heading out for a nice dinner and a few drinks. On this holiday, however, a gentle 5 mile walk was pretty much all I could manage.

Of course, I know that I am lucky I can walk 5 miles. There are many people in the world who are not so fortunate, and there are a multitude of reasons why people can no longer do things they used to once love, of which chronic illness is just one. I know these things, and I remind myself of how lucky I am every day. But sometimes, the sense of loss all gets a little too much and I roll into a big hole of self-pity.

Unfortunately today is one of these days. We were driving back from Wales and we were both feeling a little hungry, so we stopped at a service station to try and grab a snack. My boyfriend found himself a couple of tasty morsels, but there was nothing gluten & dairy free there for me except a packet of rice cakes. I bought the rice cakes. I actually quite like rice cakes, but it wasn’t quite the tasty wholesome brunch I was hoping for, and seeing my boyfriend’s scotch egg (God I LOVE scotch eggs!) was enough to push me into a full-blown wallowing, self-pitying tantrum.

It just feels that illness has taken so much from me, and that packet of rice cakes was all it took for me to reflect on all the things I have lost. Independence, fertility, the ability to pop out for a meal without having to trawl through online menus first, being able to stay up late without worrying how sick it’ll make me the next day, alcohol, cake, waking up for an early-morning run…. etc etc.

I always try my damnedest not to let illness rule my life. Quote from the front page of this blog: ” I do not accept that I should lie back and let Epstein Barr define me”. But sometimes it feels like I am fighting a losing battle. As time goes on I feel like it rules more and more of my life. It is on my mind every second of every day. The first thing I think when I wake up each morning is, how sick do I feel today? The last thing I think when I go to bed at night is, how sick will I be tomorrow? Every single decision I make – career choices, whether to go to yoga class or go home and rest, what to have for dinner, what time to go to bed, whether to make plans with friends – is made with chronic illness in mind. I am so sick of the control it has not only over my body, but my mind, and actually my entire life. I fear that the day is just around the corner when I will be entirely defined by illness. That, if asked to describe me in one sentence, my family and friends would say “she’s the one who’s always sick”.

The blogging effect

A little over 24 hours since I became ‘ebvwarrior’. A half-hearted, unconsidered decision. Turns out it may just be the best decision I’ve made for a long time.

I honestly didn’t think anyone would be interested in reading my blog. I don’t mean that in a self-pity kind of way, just that your own life always seems so mundane and average that you can’t really imagine other people being interested enough to sit down and read about it. I confess, this blog is a selfish blog. A way for me to track my progress, write down how I’m feeling, and keep a diary without it feeling like a naff polly-pocket affair reminiscent of my teenage years.

But since posting my first blog I have been inundated with messages from people all over: friends, friends of friends, friends of friends of friends. The last few weeks have been difficult and frustrating for me health-wise, and I was feeling a little worn down. But today, I feel uplifted and inspired by all you wonderful people who have taken the time not only to read my blog, but to actually take the time out of your day to write me a message of support.

Thank you readers, I feel infinitely less alone than I did 24 hours ago x

The emotions of chronic illness

It seems strange that in deciding what my first blog post should be, I have focused on the emotions rather than the physical symptoms. I am a bit of a keep-it-all-inside kind of person. Battling with this illness for 12 years, friends have come and gone, relationships have ended, that’s just the way of life. There is only really one person who has been there through it all, and that’s my mum. So I suppose you get used to dealing with it all yourself. What’s the point of talking to someone about how you feel when they can’t possibly understand what you’re going through, and when they might not be in your life anymore come next week, next month, next year?

When I’m sick, all my energy is taken up with the sickness, so that talking about how I’m feeling becomes even harder than normal. I’m sure there’s a primal, physical aspect to that – your body needs to preserve energy to fight the infection, right? Social chit-chat is definitely very low down on my list of priorities when I’m feeling sick, which must be pretty hard for my loved ones to deal with sometimes.

Chronic illness is a constant cycle of emotions. When I’m sick I’m filled with sadness, despair, hopelessness, disappointment. When I get better there’s happiness, excitement, hope, but there’s still anxiety, fear, worries about the future.

I am always seeking new information that may help me – new supplements, a new diet, a new medication, a new doctor. But sometimes that information can be overwhelming. I have read about so many different diets that might help EBV. No gluten, no dairy, paleo, vegetarian, autoimmune protocol, low sugar, low carb, and my most recent discovery – low arginine (blog post on that coming up). Then there’s the supplements: multi-vitamins, fish oil, monolaurin, cordiceps, colloidal silver, lysine….I could go on and on. In theory, all this information is great. But where the hell do you start when you are all on your own with a million different things that ‘might’ make you feel better? How long do you try something before concluding it hasn’t helped? Do you do one thing at a time or just bung them all in there and hope for the best? This is where my scientist-researcher brain probably makes life harder. How can it be a controlled experiment with so many factors at play?

So then comes the despair and hopelessness. How can I possibly get better if I have absolutely no idea what might actually help? In science you’re always taught to think about your sources. A peer-reviewed academic publication is a more reliable source than a random comment from one person online. But what do you do when 100s of people say that xyz has helped them with their illness? Is it worth taking the shot, even though your doctor would probably laugh in your face if they knew what you were trying?

And then I feel angry that I am spending so much time and energy researching these things when I could be enjoying life. At what point does information-seeking become obsession? When should you let go and accept the situation for what it is? It is a fine balance between not giving up the fight for good health, and not aimlessly searching for a cure that doesn’t exist.

But the worst emotion, the absolute worst, is loneliness. I am very lucky to have a wide support network of friends and family. But none of them have experienced chronic EBV. Almost all of my friends see me only when I am well, so they truly have no understanding of what my life is really like, and I can’t expect them to. Even my closest loved ones still don’t have to experience it first-hand. No-one else can share my physical experience, it is mine and mine alone, and that is a lonely old place to be. I think that is why I spend so much time researching online. There is a strange comfort in reading a story that mirrors your own, in realising you are not alone. At least I can be thankful of living in the age of the internet, where I can connect to other people who are sick too.

In fact, I have a lot to be thankful for. Love, support, a career, a roof over my head, and a body that, despite its flaws, still allows me to practice yoga sometimes, or feel the sand between my toes. I am not sick all the time. The unpredictability of how and when I’ll be sick is one of the things I find hardest, but at least it means I have days where I can function like a normal human being. In fact, at the moment, I have quite a lot of those days. I get to play with my nieces, practice my headstands, make love to my boyfriend (sorry mum). And chronic illness at least means that I will never take those simple pleasures for granted.