The mind/body dichotomy

I have a long-standing interest in the relationship between the mind and the body. A lot of my life history has drawn me towards it: my psychology degree taught me all about the theory of the mind, chronic illness has taught me how the mind can negatively affect the body (I often experience flares when I am stressed or sleep-deprived, for example), and my yoga practice has shown me the amazing things we can achieve when the mind and body work together in harmony.

But the thing is, the very concept of mind/body bothers me, and the more I think about it, the more confused I get. Where does the mind stop and the body begin? How can we possibly separate them out into two entities that can be described and studied without consideration to the other? Is there even any value in having these two distinct words; what do we gain by treating them separately?

I have recently been studying some of the medical literature about the relationship between physical symptoms and mental ill health, and what stands out for me is that even the experts on this topic, in the Western world at least, treat them as two separate ‘things’. Take for example, this study on the use of psychological interventions for people with emotional disorders and chronic illness. The very first line of the paper says: “Emotional disorder associated with physical illness falls into two main groups: psychological reaction to physical illness and somatic presentation of psychological disorder.” So either a) you have a physical illness and it makes you depressed/anxious etc, OR b) you have a mental illness that just happens to express itself as physical symptoms like tummy aches. But how valid is this distinction, and how useful is it to think about these relationships in such a linear fashion (i.e. A causes B)?

Could we not say, instead, that health is just health, and we all fall on a health continuum ranging from very poor to very good? Anyone who’s ever had depression will know that it can make you feel absolutely terrible physically – you might feel exhausted even though you get 10 hours of sleep every night, you might have constant headaches or migraines, or you might be picking up every bug going around. And anyone who’s ever had a chronic illness will most likely have felt pretty shit mentally at times, because feeling lousy for extended periods of time really does start to drag you down after a while, no matter how good your coping mechanisms. In fact, even an acute illness like the flu can really mess with your head, because as much as the idea of lying in bed all day sounds delightful when you don’t get to do it very often, once you’re forced into it you quickly start to feel like you’re in prison.

I’ve had times in my life where mental illness was my primary health concern and my only diagnosis, and I’ve had other times where my physical health was in a very poor state but my mental health was, all things considered, pretty good. But how much did those diagnoses of ‘mental health problem’ and ‘physical health problem’ really help me? In fact, I think these categories can actually be quite damaging, both for the individual and for our progress in understanding disease. Because the very presence of this mind/body dichotomy means that when a doctor suggests a psychological treatment, it immediately sends a message to the patient that this problem is all in their head. And I know both from personal experience and from the experiences of others with chronic illness, that this can make you feel disbelieved; that you have to somehow defend the physical nature of your illness.

But this attitude means that people who could be benefitting from psychological support are not getting it, because to accept psychological help means you are admitting defeat – if this is in my head, then it cannot be physical. Likewise, I think that having a diagnosis of a mental illness can make medical professionals very quick to discount anything other than that mental illness as a cause of problematic symptoms, adding to the cycle of feeling disbelieved and unsupported.

I dream of a world where this mind/body distinction is a thing of the past. Where we all recognise that the mind and body are intertwined, so much so that we talk about them as one entity without even realising that’s what we’re doing. Where there is no shame in accepting that the way feel in our heads might be affecting the way we feel physically, or vice versa. Scientists don’t know it all, and just because something is widely accepted by very clever people, it doesn’t mean that it is the most helpful way to think about things, or even that it is true. Didn’t the brightest minds in the world once believe that the earth was flat?

 

2 thoughts on “The mind/body dichotomy

  1. On another level, isn’t the mind all physical anyway as it’s the result of synaptic impulses… We are animals with advanced minds but they cannot exist without the physical tissues which make up our bodies. Really interesting read miss Finning x

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