The art of self-acceptance

When you are living in hope of a different life, you are wasting the one you already have.

The last couple of months have been quite bad for me health-wise. I’ve cut right back on my hobbies and social activities because getting through a day at work is, most of the time, all I can manage. This has meant a huge cut in the amount of time I’ve spent with my friends.

For some reason, socialising is particularly exhausting when I’m unwell. All activities are exhausting to some extent, and pacing is a concept I am finally trying to increasingly bring into my life. I have always been very resistant to the idea of pacing – I don’t WANT to rest, I shouldn’t HAVE to rest, it’s not fair blah blah blah woe is me. But recently I have begun to accept that this is my life. Whether or not it’ll be my life forever, I really don’t know. I sure hope not, but right now this is what I’m dealing with and being able to pace, knowing when to stop and learning where my boundary lies on a particular day, is something I believe will be really important if I want to maintain a reasonable quality of life.

But for reasons I’m not quite sure of, social contact is one of the activities I have to be extra careful with. As a fairly introverted person I think part of it is just that it’s in my nature to find social situations quite tiring. But there definitely seems to be some relationship to chronic illness, and I’ve interestingly read some other blogs that have said similar things. Social interaction is just exhausting when you’re battling poor health.

An extra challenge arises when your health is unpredictable, because social events require plans, and sticking to plans can prove to be very tricky if you don’t know how you’re going to be feeling on any given day. There is nothing much that makes me feel worse than having to cancel on a friend because I’m too sick. Not only do I have the usual disappointment for myself not being able to do something I was looking forward to, but there’s the added guilt of having let your friend down last-minute.

So, much to my sadness, meeting up with friends has taken a bit of a back seat recently. Today I drove past a restaurant where me and one of my close friends like to go, and it made me think of her. She had a very important interview recently and I wasn’t able to offer her help in preparing for it as I had hoped, as I wasn’t very well. I was suddenly hit with a huge wave of guilt that I have really not been much of a friend to her recently. So I sent her a message to say I’m sorry I’ve not been much fun lately. And this was her reply:

“You don’t have to be fun….ever”

Those few small words meant so much to me that I can’t even begin to express it in words. Because, those words imply one thing – acceptance. My friend is accepting me exactly as I am right now. Not as the version of me I wish I could be more often. Not as the healthy me. Not as the fun me, the drunk me, the let’s-go-on-an-adventure me, the I-can-help-you-with-your-interview me. Just me.

I am very fortunate to have a handful of people who show me complete acceptance. My family are wonderful, never expecting anything from me, but giving me infinite love and support. Likewise, my boyfriend has shown me that it’s ok to rest, to take care of myself, even if that means sacrificing fun plans we have made together. And I have several friends who, despite all the times I’ve had to cancel my arrangements with them, have never responded with anything other than “get well soon”.

Self-acceptance is hard for us all at times, but it is especially hard when you crave a life that you cannot live. I long for good health, for my illness to be taken away and to be able to live a life without it. But I think it’s fair to say that for the forseeable future that probably isn’t going to happen. Life is now more about managing it than curing it, and with that comes a longing for all the things I feel I am losing or have already lost. It is a fine balance between acceptance and giving up. I don’t want to give up on the notion that I may achieve good health again one day. But I also don’t want to spend much more of my life wishing for things to be different, because when you are living in hope of a different life, you are wasting the one you already have.

Accepting a situation that you are unhappy with is not easy. Accepting a version of yourself that you wouldn’t choose to be, is not easy. But having total acceptance from the people you care about is one giant step towards self-acceptance.

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