The advantage of disadvantage

I recently watched a video of Michelle Obama giving a speech to students at the City College of New York (link here: http://qz.com/700823/michelle-obama-told-graduates-of-the-poor-mans-harvard-that-living-without-privilege-is-an-advantage/ )

The general message was this: facing adversity is an advantage, not a disadvantage. It reminded me of a book I once read called David & Goliath, by Malcolm Gladwell (well worth a read FYI!). It is a series of stories of what Gladwell calls “ordinary people confronting giants”; people facing all kinds of adversity and disadvantage. I think his message goes a little bit further than Michelle’s. I wholeheartedly agree with her argument that facing adversity makes you stronger, allows you to handle setbacks and makes you better equipped to deal with challenges in the future, giving you an ‘edge’ over those who haven’t faced such adversity.

But in David & Goliath, Malcolm Gladwell’s argument is that being the underdog in any given situation fundamentally changes you. It opens doors, creates opportunities, educates, and allows you to achieve things that others might deem unthinkable. The advantages of disadvantage, he says, go well beyond just making you more resilient.

I read this book about a year ago when I was at a real low-point with my health, and the message behind it really impacted me. It allowed me to reframe my sickness and see the situation in a totally different way.

Now let’s get this straight: I’m not trying to polish a turd, chronic illness sucks. Actually, all illness sucks. Anyone who’s ever had a cold, a sore throat, a tummy bug, an injury, surgery, depression, pain – in that moment when you are suffering, it’s hard to think about anything else, it consumes you. I think, therefore, that even those who’ve never experienced chronic illness can still picture what it might be like. Imagine that cold/tummy bug/injury coming back over and over and over again, a permanent parrot on your shoulder, a constant threat of illness and pain that could strike at any moment without warning. If I could choose to go back and live the last 12 years of my life without chronic illness, I would absolutely be there in a heartbeat.

But, reframing my illness to focus not on how bad it is or how unfair it is, and instead thinking about the advantages it has brought me, has been massively helpful in my ability to deal with it and stay emotionally healthy. And I don’t just mean superficially telling myself what a wonderful thing it is to be sick, that would be stupid. I mean really thinking about all the positive things that have happened as a result. And the truth is, there really are a lot of positives. I would not be the person I am today if it wasn’t for chronic illness. I mean, I would literally be a different person. It has totally shaped my entire adult life, both who I am and the things I have achieved. And honestly, I quite like who I am, and I quite like my life too.

These are just a few of the examples of positive things that have come from my illness:

  • It has made me extensively research the effect of nutrition on health and illness, and has therefore led me to a way of life that is infinitely healthier than the one I was leading a few years ago. Chronic illness or not, taking good care of our bodies has to be a good thing, right?
  • It has made maintaining friendships quite difficult at times, which therefore means that the friends I have now are all people who are patient and understanding, who don’t pressure me into doing things I can’t do and who try their best to support me in various different ways.
  • Ok, this one might seem a little ridiculous. But I am bloody good at crochet! I started learning to crochet last year when I was unwell a lot and I could no longer do many of the things I used to enjoy (running and playing music were the two biggies). So to fill my time I taught myself to crochet using youtube tutorials. Well, not to blow my own trumpet but I’m pretty darn good at it now so, two fingers to you EBV.

These are just a few examples. There really are many, many more. So, to anyone reading this, I encourage you to reframe your difficulties. Of course, adversity sucks, it’s human nature to want to avoid unpleasant situations and feelings. But no matter what the situation, I promise you that somewhere in there there is a positive to be had, and thinking about the situation from a different perspective may just make it all feel a little less overwhelming.

 

2 thoughts on “The advantage of disadvantage

  1. This is really interesting Katie! It was the topic of my doctoral thesis. There’s lots of stuff written about it, often under the term “transformative change” 🙂

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    • Oh wow, who knew it was an actual ‘thing’! Thanks Alice. If you have any papers on it I’d absolutely love to give them a read 🙂 x

      Like

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